Tofu Pad Thai

A Passion for Food… A Passion for Flavour – Melanie daPonte

Melanie daPonte, Vegan Personal Chef

Image courtesy of Steve daPonte Image courtesy Steve daPonte

This is a quick and easy recipe for a Thai restaurant favorite. I like to make this dish at home, because I can choose the ingredients. I think it tastes even better than traditionally prepared. Most Thai restaurants season with fish sauce– a real bummer for vegans.

I also like to press and freeze my tofu, then thaw it completely before using in dishes where I want more texture. This method also helps tofu absorb marinade more readily. I just wrap it airtight, freeze overnight, then when thawed, I squeeze it out one more time, and use as desired.

prep

Tofu Pad Thai

from “Big Vegan” by Robin Asnell

  • ¼ cup Vegetable broth
  • 2 tbsp. Lime Juice (or more, to taste)
  • ¼ cup Tamari
  • 2 tbsp. Sugar
  • 2 tsp. Cornstarch
  • 2 tbsp. Canola oil
  • 12 ounces Firm tofu, drained and pressed
  • 1 tsp. Red pepper flakes
  • 1 tbsp. Ginger, fresh, minced, peeled
  • 2 cloves Minced garlic
  • 8 ounces Rice noodles, banh pho
  • 4 Scallions, Cut in 1 inch…

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Butternut Squash Tacos

The OM Project!

The OM Project

I probably should have waited for Tuesday to post this one up, but every day is a good day for a taco, especially when it’s a healthy one! I love the color contrast of the purple, green, and orange of these butternut squash tacos.

Feel free to get creative with the dressings too: green goddess, lemon dill, or even a shawarma sauce would work.

Try to pick out a whole grain tortilla that you enjoy instead of those plain paper-like white ones, or if you’re feeling up to it, you can give making cauliflower tortillas a try.

Let us know what you think and what your favorite taco topper is in the comments below. 🙂

Time: 45 minutes (prep + cooking) | Serves: 2-3 peeps

Ingredients:

  • 1 butternut squash, seeded + cubed
  • 1/2 head of red cabbage, shredded
  • 1 red onion, diced
  • 1 can of black beans
  • 1 can of…

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Broccoli, Courgette and Wasabi Soup

The Circus Gardner’s Kitchen!

The Circus Gardener's Kitchen

broccoli, courgette and wasabi soup

Over the centuries aggressive nations have used their military might to subdue, colonise and plunder other nations for prized resources.

At one time such plunder would have consisted of “precious” minerals like gold, silver, copper and diamonds. Subsequently, with the advent of industrialisation, the exploiting nations turned their attention to the plundering of fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas.

Now, rather than precious metals and fossil fuels, it is arable land and access to water that is most prized by neo-colonialists. Our own populations continue to expand exponentially whilst simultaneously our arable farmland is disappearing, thanks to disastrous modern agricultural processes. Water is becoming increasingly precious because it is a finite resource with more and more of us demanding access to it.

The principal neo-colonialist nations of the 21st century are China, India, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, the USA and western European nations, in particular the UK…

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Sesame Noodles with Ginger-Soy Braised Tofu and Steamed Broccoli

A Passion For Food…A Passion For Flavor! – Melanie daPonte

Melanie daPonte, Vegan Personal Chef

IMG_3741

Ever Since I found out my beloved Ma Po Tofu at PF Changs contains more than a full day’s worth of  sodium (3450 mg) I’ve been getting creative coming up with quick Asian lunch ideas.

I cook an extra serving or two of spaghetti at dinner time and store it in the fridge for later. That’s the first timesaver. With a few spare minutes in the kitchen I whip up an easy sesame sauce that is delicious over noodles, or just for dipping steamed broccoli. In about 2 micro- minutes I braise up some tofu to add some protein to my lunch. Toss in some steamed veggies and I’ve got a delicious, nutritious meal for lunch or dinner.

Quick Asian Noodle Sauce

Recipe courtesy Jenna Webber (www.eatliverun.com)

     ½ cup Tahini

       ¼ cup Canola oil

       ½ cup Hot water, as needed

       ¼ cup Sugar

       ¼

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Kung Pao Cauliflower

The OM Project.

The OM Project

This recipe by Circus Gardener’s Kitchen is similar to the spicy cauliflower wings I posted up a few weeks back. Treating cauliflower like little bites of chicken, you can season them, bake them, and grill them exactly the same way. Think of this as healthy General Gao’s and stick little tooth picks in them.

Ingredients

1 head of cauliflower, broken into florets, each about 1½-2 cm
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 red chillies, seeds in, finely chopped
2 cm piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped
4 spring onions, sliced, including green parts
50 g unsalted peanuts, dry fried and roughly chopped
2 tbsp fresh coriander, chopped
50 g organic cornflour

for the ma-la cooking oil

125 ml roasted peanut oil (use groundnut oil if not available)
2 star anise
1 tsp Szechuan peppercorns
1 tsp dried chillies
1 tbsp toasted sesame oil

for the marinade

100 ml organic…

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Radish, Broad Bean and Mint Salad

More healthy goodness from The Circus Gardner’s Kitchen!

The Circus Gardener's Kitchen

radish broad bean and mint salad

Supermarkets deploy a considerable amount of science to exert subtle influences over our shopping habits and impulses.

For example, all supermarkets now use planogram software to help with store layout in order to stimulate our purchasing behaviour and increase revenues. Essentially, planograms are used to determine where each product should be placed, not only to make the shelves we pass visually appealing but also to ensure each product is in the optimum place to maximise its sales revenue.

This usually means that more expensive items are placed around eye level. If you think about it, the science seems to work: how often do you find you need to reach up or bend down to pick up a product to put in your basket?

So important is the science behind planograms that some food manufacturers pay for “product placement”, in order to get their products placed in the most advantageous…

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Tuscan style bean and vegetable soup

I always get the tinned version, so I can’t wait to try this!

The Circus Gardener's Kitchen

tuscan bean and vegetable soup

When we think of pollinators, we tend to think about bees, but butterflies are another important insect in the cycle of plant life. They pollinate plants whilst searching for plant nectar and, just like bees, their numbers are in alarming decline.

In its report “The State of the UK’s butterflies 2015”, the Butterfly Conservation charity has recorded what it calls “major slumps” in the numbers of common butterfly species.

The decline is most noticeable on farmland, where the numbers of widespread UK butterfly species declined by 58% in the first nine years of this century. Research published in November suggested strong links between this decline and the use by farmers of neonicotinoid pesticides. These pesticides, subject to a temporary ban within the European Union, are also strongly implicated in the alarming decline in our bee populations.

In the midst of this gloomy overall picture there are some positive stories…

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